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¿Ser o no ser parte de una red?

Texto publicado en el periódico “Ciudad Capital” el 3 de julio de 2013

Por Bernardo Farill – @bernardofarill *

Preguntarse si queremos ser parte de las redes actuales resulta ser una pregunta retórica y algo sobrante. Somos parte de muchas redes…

View Post

urbnist:

theatlanticcities:

What metaphor do you see in this sand-constructed Levittown?

Chad Wright’s “Master Plan” resembles a cookie cutter suburb washed away by the rising tide. Wright says the art installation ”examines the tract home as a symbol for the American Dream” with its houses and streets forming 13 rows, just like the stripes of the American flag.

Read: Suburbia in Sand: Choose Your Own Metaphor

[Images: Lynn Kloythanomsup/Architectural Black]

I think it makes a better artistic statement about coastal hazards and sea level rise than it does about the American suburban dream.

Deberíamos hacer esto en las playas del GDF:

unsection:

Untapped Cities

Street sections were much more of a concern 93 years ago. Transportation technology was changing and so, we thought, should our streets.

(vía humanscalecities)

Mark Twain on New York:

All men in New York insult you—there seem to be no exceptions. There are
exceptions of course—have been—but they are probably dead. I am speaking
of all persons there who are clothed in a little brief authority.
- Notebook, April - Aug. 1885

There is one thing very sure—I can’t keep my temper in New York. The cars
and carriages always come along and get in the way just as I want to cross
a street, and if there is any thing that can make a man soar into flights
of sublimity in the matter of profanity, it is that thing.
- Letter written to San Francisco *Alta California*, June 5,
1867

You do not swear anymore now, of course, because you can’t find any words
that are long enough or strong enough to fit the case. You feel degraded
and ignominious and subjugated. And there and then you say that you will go
away from New York and start over again; and that you will never come back
to settle permanently till you have learned to swear with the utmost
fluency in seventeen different languages.
- Letter written to San Francisco *Alta California*, June 5,
1867

I have at last, after several months’ experience, made up my mind that it
is a splendid desert—a domed and steepled solitude, where the stranger is
lonely in the midst of a million of his race. A man walks his tedious miles
through the same interminable street every day, elbowing his way through a
buzzing multitude of men, yet never seeing a familiar face, and never
seeing a strange one the second time. He visits a friend once—it is a
day’s journey—and then stays away from that time forward till that friends
cools to a mere acquaintance, and finally to a stranger. So there is little
sociability, and consequently, there is little cordiality. Every man seems
to feel that he has got the duties of two lifetimes to accomplish in one,
and so he rushes, rushes, rushes, and never has time to be
companionable—never has any time at his disposal to fool away on matters
which do not involve dollars and duty and business.
- Letter to San Francisco *Alta California*, June 5, 1867

There is something about this ceaseless buzz, and hurry, and bustle, that
keeps a stranger in a state of unwholesome excitement all the time, and
makes him restless and uneasy, and saps from him all capacity to enjoy
anything or take a strong interest in any matter whatever—a something
which impels him to try to do everything, and yet permits him to do
nothing. He is a boy in a candy-shop—could choose quickly if there were
but one kind of candy, but is hopelessly undetermined in the midst of a
hundred kinds. A stranger feels unsatisfied, here, a good part of the time.
- Letter written to San Francisco *Alta California*, June 5,
1867»»

urbnist:

ronelsax:

Eco-bici. #urbanism #mexico #reto365fotos 128/365

What a beautiful, beautiful sight

urbnist:

ronelsax:

Eco-bici. #urbanism #mexico #reto365fotos 128/365

What a beautiful, beautiful sight

Life in the City Is Essentially One Giant Math Problem (Smithsonian)

urbnist:

I’m wary of reduction to formulas and predictive models, but the act of putting these things together does at the very least expand our understanding of the relative impact and importance of the inputs used by the formulas and models. In that sense, I believe these things are a worthy exercise, but to the extent that they are still reductionist I hope they do not become regarded as the end all be all. 

Mmh. “Experts” in the field of quantitative urbanism…

(Fuente: capriox-durmitte)

99% Invisible: Episode 76- The Modern Moloch

99percentinvisible:

On the streets of early 20th Century America, nothing moved faster than 10 miles per hour. Responsible parents would tell their children, “Go outside, and play in the streets. All day.”

And then the automobile happened. And then automobiles began killing thousands of children, every year.

image

(Credit: New York Times, Nov 23, 1924)

Much of the public viewed the car as a death machine. One newspaper cartoon even compared the car to Moloch, the god to whom the Ammonites supposedly sacrificed their children.

image

Pedestrian deaths were considered public tragedies. Cities held parades and built monuments in memory of children who had been struck and killed by cars. Mothers of children killed in the streets were given a special white star to honor their loss.

image
(Courtesy of Peter Norton)
The main cause for these deaths was that the rules of the street were vastly different than how they are today. A street functioned like a city park, or a pedestrian mall, where you could move in any direction without really thinking about it. The only moving hazards were animals and other people.  
Turn-of-the-century footage from San Francisco’s Market Street shows just how casually people strode into the street.

Popout

If a car hit someone, the car was to blame. From the New York Times, November 23, 1924:
 

The horrors of peace appear to be appalling than the horrors of war. The automobile looms up as a far more destructive piece of mechanism than the machine gun. The reckless motorist deals more death the artilleryman. The man in streets seems less safe than the man in the trench. The greatest single lethal factor is the automobile. It left shambles in its wake as it coursed through 1923.

image  image 

(From left: poster by Harry de Bauffer, reproduced in “Poster Wins Second Prize,” Milwaukee Journal, September 28, 1920; poster by George Starkey, reproduced in “Winning Safety Poster,” Milwaukee Journal, September 25, 1920.)

Automotive interests banded together under the name Motordom. One of Motordom’s public relations gurus was a man named E. B. Lefferts, who put forth a radical idea: don’t blame cars, blame human recklessness. Lefferts and Motordom sought to exonerate the machine by placing the blame with individuals.
 
And it wasn’t just drivers who could be reckless—pedestrians could be reckless, too. Children could be reckless.
 
This subtle shift allowed for streets to be re-imagined as a place where cars belonged, and where people didn’t. Part of this re-imagining had to do with changing the way people thought of their relationship to the street. Motordom didn’t want people just strolling in.
 
So they coined a new term: “Jay Walking.” 
 
In the early 20th Century, “jay” was a derogatory term for someone from the countryside. Therefore, a “jaywalker” is someone who walks around the city like a jay, gawking at all the big buildings, and who is oblivious to traffic around him. The term was originally used to disparage those who got in the way of other pedestrians, but Motordom rebranded it as a legal term to mean someone who crossed the street at the wrong place or time.
 
Over time, Americans began to view their relationship to the automobile as a sort of love affair—which means that logic need not always apply.  Groucho Marx even said so himself!
image
 
(Credit: Works Progress Administration/Federal Art  Poster illustrated by Isadore Posoff, 1937)
Our reporter this week is Jesse Dukes, who spoke with historian Peter Norton about the invention of jaywalking. 
We just learned today (literally!) that Peter Norton previously appeared on BackStory With the American History Guys in 2008, speaking with host Brian Balogh (who also happens to have been Peter Norton’s dissertation adviser). Check out that interview here.
And here’s Peter Norton over at The Atlantic Cities.
We had help recreating historical (and counterfactual) America with the vocal talent of Snap Judgment’s Pat Mesiti-Miller, Stephanie Foo, Anna Sussman, Will Urbina, and Nick van der Kolk. Their recent episode Making It Work is an instant classic!
Support for this episode comes in part from Tiny Letter—email for people with something to say!
Support also comes from Squarespace, offering listeners a free trial and 10% new orders—head to squarespace.com/99invisible and use the code “invisible4”.

(Fuente: 99percentinvisible)

Las Ciudades de Game of Thrones. Preciosas animaciones de ciudades pseudo-medievales que tenían que ser casi autosuficientes para existir:

(Fuente: slumbrslumbrs)

El espacio personal que goza cada persona (en burdo promedio) en las grandes ciudades del mundo.

El espacio personal que goza cada persona (en burdo promedio) en las grandes ciudades del mundo.

Aeroflorale II - La Machine by frashier on Flickr.
For the 2010 Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II,
via architectureofdoom

Aeroflorale II - La Machine by frashier on Flickr.

For the 2010 Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II,

via architectureofdoom

(Fuente: weissesrauschen, vía urbanscenarios)

Lluvia sobre (un pedazo de) Tokyo

Lluvia sobre (un pedazo de) Tokyo

The Paradox of Intensification

"Abstract
Urban intensification as part of a smart growth strategy can facilitate low
energy
transport modes and reduce overall car use, with benefits to the global
environment but
evidence suggests the effect will be less than proportional. Hence, in
locations where
intensification occurs, greater concentrations of traffic tend to occur,
and this worsens
local environmental conditions. This phenomenon is defined below as the
“paradox of
intensification”. The consequent challenges for planners and policymakers
which arise
are considered. The analysis suggests that a compromise involving limited
intensification would merely redistribute the balance between the two sets
of problems:
global and local. It is concluded that urban intensification should be
accompanied by
more radical measures to constrain traffic generation within intensified
areas.”

The valley once known as having the “most transparent air”:

[image: Inline image 1]

The valley once known as having the “most transparent air”:

[image: Inline image 1]

¿Ser o no ser parte de una red?

Texto publicado en el periódico “Ciudad Capital” el 3 de julio de 2013

Por Bernardo Farill – @bernardofarill *

Preguntarse si queremos ser parte de las redes actuales resulta ser una pregunta retórica y algo sobrante. Somos parte de muchas redes…

View Post

urbnist:

theatlanticcities:

What metaphor do you see in this sand-constructed Levittown?

Chad Wright’s “Master Plan” resembles a cookie cutter suburb washed away by the rising tide. Wright says the art installation ”examines the tract home as a symbol for the American Dream” with its houses and streets forming 13 rows, just like the stripes of the American flag.

Read: Suburbia in Sand: Choose Your Own Metaphor

[Images: Lynn Kloythanomsup/Architectural Black]

I think it makes a better artistic statement about coastal hazards and sea level rise than it does about the American suburban dream.

Deberíamos hacer esto en las playas del GDF:

unsection:

Untapped Cities

Street sections were much more of a concern 93 years ago. Transportation technology was changing and so, we thought, should our streets.

(vía humanscalecities)

Mark Twain on New York:

All men in New York insult you—there seem to be no exceptions. There are
exceptions of course—have been—but they are probably dead. I am speaking
of all persons there who are clothed in a little brief authority.
- Notebook, April - Aug. 1885

There is one thing very sure—I can’t keep my temper in New York. The cars
and carriages always come along and get in the way just as I want to cross
a street, and if there is any thing that can make a man soar into flights
of sublimity in the matter of profanity, it is that thing.
- Letter written to San Francisco *Alta California*, June 5,
1867

You do not swear anymore now, of course, because you can’t find any words
that are long enough or strong enough to fit the case. You feel degraded
and ignominious and subjugated. And there and then you say that you will go
away from New York and start over again; and that you will never come back
to settle permanently till you have learned to swear with the utmost
fluency in seventeen different languages.
- Letter written to San Francisco *Alta California*, June 5,
1867

I have at last, after several months’ experience, made up my mind that it
is a splendid desert—a domed and steepled solitude, where the stranger is
lonely in the midst of a million of his race. A man walks his tedious miles
through the same interminable street every day, elbowing his way through a
buzzing multitude of men, yet never seeing a familiar face, and never
seeing a strange one the second time. He visits a friend once—it is a
day’s journey—and then stays away from that time forward till that friends
cools to a mere acquaintance, and finally to a stranger. So there is little
sociability, and consequently, there is little cordiality. Every man seems
to feel that he has got the duties of two lifetimes to accomplish in one,
and so he rushes, rushes, rushes, and never has time to be
companionable—never has any time at his disposal to fool away on matters
which do not involve dollars and duty and business.
- Letter to San Francisco *Alta California*, June 5, 1867

There is something about this ceaseless buzz, and hurry, and bustle, that
keeps a stranger in a state of unwholesome excitement all the time, and
makes him restless and uneasy, and saps from him all capacity to enjoy
anything or take a strong interest in any matter whatever—a something
which impels him to try to do everything, and yet permits him to do
nothing. He is a boy in a candy-shop—could choose quickly if there were
but one kind of candy, but is hopelessly undetermined in the midst of a
hundred kinds. A stranger feels unsatisfied, here, a good part of the time.
- Letter written to San Francisco *Alta California*, June 5,
1867»»

urbnist:

ronelsax:

Eco-bici. #urbanism #mexico #reto365fotos 128/365

What a beautiful, beautiful sight

urbnist:

ronelsax:

Eco-bici. #urbanism #mexico #reto365fotos 128/365

What a beautiful, beautiful sight

Life in the City Is Essentially One Giant Math Problem (Smithsonian)

urbnist:

I’m wary of reduction to formulas and predictive models, but the act of putting these things together does at the very least expand our understanding of the relative impact and importance of the inputs used by the formulas and models. In that sense, I believe these things are a worthy exercise, but to the extent that they are still reductionist I hope they do not become regarded as the end all be all. 

Mmh. “Experts” in the field of quantitative urbanism…

(Fuente: capriox-durmitte)

99% Invisible: Episode 76- The Modern Moloch

99percentinvisible:

On the streets of early 20th Century America, nothing moved faster than 10 miles per hour. Responsible parents would tell their children, “Go outside, and play in the streets. All day.”

And then the automobile happened. And then automobiles began killing thousands of children, every year.

image

(Credit: New York Times, Nov 23, 1924)

Much of the public viewed the car as a death machine. One newspaper cartoon even compared the car to Moloch, the god to whom the Ammonites supposedly sacrificed their children.

image

Pedestrian deaths were considered public tragedies. Cities held parades and built monuments in memory of children who had been struck and killed by cars. Mothers of children killed in the streets were given a special white star to honor their loss.

image
(Courtesy of Peter Norton)
The main cause for these deaths was that the rules of the street were vastly different than how they are today. A street functioned like a city park, or a pedestrian mall, where you could move in any direction without really thinking about it. The only moving hazards were animals and other people.  
Turn-of-the-century footage from San Francisco’s Market Street shows just how casually people strode into the street.

Popout

If a car hit someone, the car was to blame. From the New York Times, November 23, 1924:
 

The horrors of peace appear to be appalling than the horrors of war. The automobile looms up as a far more destructive piece of mechanism than the machine gun. The reckless motorist deals more death the artilleryman. The man in streets seems less safe than the man in the trench. The greatest single lethal factor is the automobile. It left shambles in its wake as it coursed through 1923.

image  image 

(From left: poster by Harry de Bauffer, reproduced in “Poster Wins Second Prize,” Milwaukee Journal, September 28, 1920; poster by George Starkey, reproduced in “Winning Safety Poster,” Milwaukee Journal, September 25, 1920.)

Automotive interests banded together under the name Motordom. One of Motordom’s public relations gurus was a man named E. B. Lefferts, who put forth a radical idea: don’t blame cars, blame human recklessness. Lefferts and Motordom sought to exonerate the machine by placing the blame with individuals.
 
And it wasn’t just drivers who could be reckless—pedestrians could be reckless, too. Children could be reckless.
 
This subtle shift allowed for streets to be re-imagined as a place where cars belonged, and where people didn’t. Part of this re-imagining had to do with changing the way people thought of their relationship to the street. Motordom didn’t want people just strolling in.
 
So they coined a new term: “Jay Walking.” 
 
In the early 20th Century, “jay” was a derogatory term for someone from the countryside. Therefore, a “jaywalker” is someone who walks around the city like a jay, gawking at all the big buildings, and who is oblivious to traffic around him. The term was originally used to disparage those who got in the way of other pedestrians, but Motordom rebranded it as a legal term to mean someone who crossed the street at the wrong place or time.
 
Over time, Americans began to view their relationship to the automobile as a sort of love affair—which means that logic need not always apply.  Groucho Marx even said so himself!
image
 
(Credit: Works Progress Administration/Federal Art  Poster illustrated by Isadore Posoff, 1937)
Our reporter this week is Jesse Dukes, who spoke with historian Peter Norton about the invention of jaywalking. 
We just learned today (literally!) that Peter Norton previously appeared on BackStory With the American History Guys in 2008, speaking with host Brian Balogh (who also happens to have been Peter Norton’s dissertation adviser). Check out that interview here.
And here’s Peter Norton over at The Atlantic Cities.
We had help recreating historical (and counterfactual) America with the vocal talent of Snap Judgment’s Pat Mesiti-Miller, Stephanie Foo, Anna Sussman, Will Urbina, and Nick van der Kolk. Their recent episode Making It Work is an instant classic!
Support for this episode comes in part from Tiny Letter—email for people with something to say!
Support also comes from Squarespace, offering listeners a free trial and 10% new orders—head to squarespace.com/99invisible and use the code “invisible4”.

(Fuente: 99percentinvisible)

Las Ciudades de Game of Thrones. Preciosas animaciones de ciudades pseudo-medievales que tenían que ser casi autosuficientes para existir:

(Fuente: slumbrslumbrs)

El espacio personal que goza cada persona (en burdo promedio) en las grandes ciudades del mundo.

El espacio personal que goza cada persona (en burdo promedio) en las grandes ciudades del mundo.

Aeroflorale II - La Machine by frashier on Flickr.
For the 2010 Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II,
via architectureofdoom

Aeroflorale II - La Machine by frashier on Flickr.

For the 2010 Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II,

via architectureofdoom

(Fuente: weissesrauschen, vía urbanscenarios)

Lluvia sobre (un pedazo de) Tokyo

Lluvia sobre (un pedazo de) Tokyo

The Paradox of Intensification

"Abstract
Urban intensification as part of a smart growth strategy can facilitate low
energy
transport modes and reduce overall car use, with benefits to the global
environment but
evidence suggests the effect will be less than proportional. Hence, in
locations where
intensification occurs, greater concentrations of traffic tend to occur,
and this worsens
local environmental conditions. This phenomenon is defined below as the
“paradox of
intensification”. The consequent challenges for planners and policymakers
which arise
are considered. The analysis suggests that a compromise involving limited
intensification would merely redistribute the balance between the two sets
of problems:
global and local. It is concluded that urban intensification should be
accompanied by
more radical measures to constrain traffic generation within intensified
areas.”

The valley once known as having the “most transparent air”:

[image: Inline image 1]

The valley once known as having the “most transparent air”:

[image: Inline image 1]

¿Ser o no ser parte de una red?
Mark Twain on New York:

Acerca de Tumblr:

Blog bilingüe de FARILL Arquitectos, noticias de Urbanismo, discusiones de ciudades y ciudadanía.
Para nuestro sitio web vaya a http://www.farillarquitectos.com o escríbanos a quiero@farillarquitectos.com

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